Judith Campisi, Ph.D.

Judith Campisi, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Professor, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

Dr. Campisi has received international recognition for her contributions to understanding why age is the largest single risk factor for developing a panoply of diseases, both degenerative (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease) and hyperproliferative (e.g., cancer). Her highly acclaimed research integrates the genetic, environmental and evolutionary forces that result in aging and age-related diseases, and identifies pathways that can be modified to mitigate basic aging processes.

Robert Ullrich, Ph.D.

Robert Ullrich, Ph.D.

Associate Director for Research, The Radiation Effects Research Foundation

Dr. Ullrich is a world-renowned expert on radiation-induced cancers. He was previously the Director of and a Professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch Comprehensive Cancer Center. In the United States, Dr. Ullrich served on scientific advisory committees for the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Department of Energy, NASA, NCRP, and the National Academies/National Research Council. Internationally he served on advisory committees including the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the European Commission, and the International Agency for Cancer Research. Dr. Ullrich has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles. Most recently the Radiation Research Society awarded him their highest honor, the Failla Medal, for his significant contributions in the radiological sciences.

Morton Cowan, M.D.

Morton Cowan, M.D.

Chief of the Pediatrics Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of California, San Francisco Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Morton J. Cowan is recognized throughout the world for research in immunodeficiency diseases, the use of alternative donors and in utero stem cell transplantation. He performed the first bone marrow transplant at UCSF Medical Center for a child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) in 1982, the first T-cell depleted transplant on the West Coast for a child with leukemia in 1985, and the first pure blood stem cell transplant from a parent to a child with SCID in North America. Cowan earned an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He completed an internship and residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in immunology at UCSF Medical Center. Cowan is the Principle Investigator of the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium which is an National Institute of Health funded research organization studying children with severe immune deficiencies representing institutions in the U.S. and Canada.